American Museum of Natural History

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American Museum of N - Gloomy octopuses (aka common Sydney octopuses, | Sometimes, ordinary people can create extraordinary | Most amphibians start..

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American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-25 00:34

Gloomy octopuses (aka common Sydney octopuses, or Octopus tetricus) have generally been thought to be loners. But in recent years, researchers have been stumbling on sites where multiple cephalopods appear to be living together in settlements. The first site, dubbed Octopolis, was descri...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-24 21:51

Sometimes, ordinary people can create extraordinary positive change. In a small community in the Mexican tropics, 16 families redesigned their lives to create an entirely self-sustaining and independent society, hoping to save their sacred and fog-laden land. The Cloud Forest (Bosque de Nieb...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-24 14:57

Most amphibians start out in water but grow up to live on land--but not axolotls. These astonishing salamanders don’t change the way other amphibians do. They stick to their watery habitat--freshwater channels and lakes near Mexico City--their whole lives, and hang on to their larval features, i...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-24 00:15

Happy Birthday to William R. Leigh! Born on this day in 1866, the gifted painter created the backgrounds for some of the Museum’s most iconic dioramas. Leigh studied art at the Royal Academy of Munich before returning to the United States, where he travelled the American West and painted lands...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-23 20:30

On this day in 1846, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle first observed Neptune, the lone gas giant planet that can’t be viewed with the naked eye. (Galileo, who used a telescope starting in 1609, likely spotted Neptune two centuries earlier--his sketches suggest he saw it in December...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-23 16:01

Hoppy International Rabbit Day! Like all jackrabbits, the black-tailed jackrabbit, Lepus californicus, is actually a hare. These close rabbit relatives are generally bigger and hardier, and they don’t burrow. Since they live in open spaces, including desert scrublands and prairies, the...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-23 01:40

“Plants are so much weirder than animals!” says Amber Paasch, 30, who will be receiving her Ph.D. degree in Comparative Biology from the Museum’s Richard Gilder Graduate School (RGGS) on September 27. “I didn’t realize how interesting they were, how diverse.”

Through college and whi...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-22 22:12

Yes, that’s a tree full of goats--a common sight in the arid region of southwestern Morocco, where the only available greenery is sometimes way above ground. The local goats learn to clamber up trees as kids, pulling off some Olympics-worthy balancing acts in pursuit of a meal.

Grazing c...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-22 18:33

Happy Elephant Appreciation Day! Elephant moms are especially worthy of appreciation—did you know their pregnancies last more than twice the length of a human pregnancy, and longer than any other species on Earth? Elephants gestate for 22 months, but their calves are born ready to roam, wa...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-22 00:07

The massive jaws of the Tyrannosaurus rex contained 60 teeth, some of which were 6 inches long (12 inches with the root). The teeth’s sharp, serrated edges indicate that this carnivorous theropod was an active predator, with a fearsome bite and powerful jaws that could have easily torn thr...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-21 21:16

This Thursday, we’re throwing it back to August 1938! This magnificent photo from the Museum’s Digital Special Collections shows Charles Lang and Otto Faulkenbach prepping a Triceratops sculpture for display. Today, Triceratops fans can visit a different exhibit: the Museum’s 65-million-year...
Related Articles

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-25 00:34

Gloomy octopuses (aka common Sydney octopuses, or Octopus tetricus) have generally been thought to be loners. But in recent years, researchers have been stumbling on sites where multiple cephalopods appear to be living together in settlements. The first site, dubbed Octopolis, was described in 2009 and considered a fluke facilitated by a human-made object. But the latest discovery of a second site, called Octlantis, off the coast of eastern Australia complicates the common view of octopuses as solitary animals. Octlantis is populated by 10-15 cephalopods who have been observed interacting with each other through posturing, chasing, and color changes--or, more forcefully, by evicting each other from dens.

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-09-24 14:57

Most amphibians start out in water but grow up to live on land--but not axolotls. These astonishing salamanders don’t change the way other amphibians do. They stick to their watery habitat--freshwater channels and lakes near Mexico City--their whole lives, and hang on to their larval features, including their gills, the feathery structures on either side of the head. Axolotls also have the amazing ability to regrow entire limbs. They experience no scarring, receive transplanted organs without rejecting them, and can even recover from injuries as grievous as a crushed spinal cord! Scientists are working to identify the genes involved in axolotls’ incredible regenerative abilities in hopes of one day applying what they learn to medicine.