American Museum of Natural History

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American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-20 01:21

Meet the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). You might know this venomous snake by one of its other names: water moccasin, gapper, or water rattlesnake. It’s a member of the pit viper subfamily, and the only viper that’s semi-aquatic. Wondering where its cottonmouth moniker comes from?...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-19 20:25

How deep would you go for a good meal? Not as far as an elephant seal. These enormous mammals have specializations that allow them to dive deeper than a mile for as long as two hours in search of food. Their blood is key to their diving ability: pound for pound, an elephant seal has three time...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-19 16:03

This spunky bird is the Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus), which ranges from the southern United States to Mexico and lives in dry deserts and scrublands, foraging for seeds on the ground. How does it differ from its close cousin, the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)? While ...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-19 01:34

Bird-like bill. Flipper-like limbs. Flat, beaver-like tail: with its mash-up of traits, the platypus may be one of the strangest mammals on Earth today! Swimming in the rivers and streams of its native Australia after dusk, the platypus closes its eyes, nose, and ears when it dives in ...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-18 20:01

Violet-backed Starlings sure are pretty in pink…or violet. Males of the species (Cinnyricinclus leucogaster) can be found sparkling in the Sun with the iridescent violet plumage that adorns their head and back. Females have brown or olive green plumage. The birds can be spotted in open woodland ...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-18 14:02

Meet Jackson’s chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii)! This critter is native to the forests of East Africa, and it prefers to live in trees rather than on the ground. Its feet are specialized for life on a limb—the toes are fused into two pads so that the chameleon can grip branches, even very t...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-18 01:17

Have you ever heard of Guanlong wucaii? It’s one of the oldest known tyrannosaurs. Guanlong sported a strange combination of features, including a large, fragile crest on its head that would have made the animal attractive to mates but vulnerable in a fight. Specimens of this dinosaur were fou...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-17 20:03

Using terms such as "whales," "dolphins," and "porpoises" can be misleading when people want a clear picture of how whales are related. The killer whale, for example, is actually the largest dolphin! People often use the term "...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-17 14:18

Are you familiar with the Etruscan shrew (Suncus etruscus)? It’s one of the smallest living land mammals in the world. It only grows 35 to 55 millimeters long and weighs in somewhere between 1.8 and 3 grams. The tiny critter lives in forest, shrub, or grassland habitats throughout Southern...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-17 01:08

New research alert! Ancient DNA reveals extinct Jamaican monkey was most closely related to South America’s titi monkeys. The unusual Jamaican monkey (Xenothrix mcgregori) was discovered by a Museum scientist in 1919 and “regarded as the most enigmatic of all New World monkeys because of its s...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-16 20:09

Hoo do you see below? Butterflies have evolved in remarkable ways that help them avoid being eaten by birds, lizards, and other predators. Some butterflies protect themselves through camouflage, while others have bright colors and distinctive wing patterns to intimidate. The wings of the owl...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-11-16 14:25

This Fossil Friday, we’re exploring the extinction of megafauna. Many species in the Museum’s fossil halls, like the mammoth, may seem familiar because they have reasonably close living relatives. Take the members of Xenarthra—which include living armadillos, tree sloths, and anteaters. Th...
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National Gallery Photo 2018-06-08 13:15

In Turner's beautifully epic portrayal of Homer's Odyssey, we see Ulysses standing aloft on his ship deriding the Cyclops, whom he and his companions have just left blinded, and invoking the vengeance of Neptune. One of the flags is painted with the scene of the Trojan Horse. The horses of the Sun are rising above the horizon ('Odyssey', Book 9). Opening on Monday, visit 'Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire' and see Turner's influence on this American artist: http://bit.ly/2JsMlxa

Tate Photo 2018-06-07 18:20

This Volunteers' Week we are celebrating the extraordinary contribution of over 500 volunteers at Tate who give their time, passion & expertise to visitors from all over the globe, across our four galleries. 'I didn’t know anything about contemporary art until I started volunteering at Tate in 2016. I’ve learnt a lot! I love passing on this knowledge to visitors. It keeps my brain active! My favourite room in Tate Britain is the 1840s room and my favourite painting is The Lady of Shalott. I like all the Pre-Raphaelites in Tate Britain. This is my favourite room and my favourite place to be.’ - Steve Daszko, volunteer visitor host with John William Waterhouse’s The Lady of Shalott 1888 https://goo.gl/RvZ97V

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Photo 2018-06-07 15:58

On view tomorrow, June 8—"Giacometti” fills the ramps of our rotunda, featuring nearly 200 sculptures, paintings, and drawings by the preeminent artist Alberto Giacometti, whose intensive focus on the human condition continues to provoke and inspire new generations. A collaboration with the Fondation Giacometti in Paris (Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti), this comprehensive exhibition examines anew the artist’s practice and his unmistakable vocabulary. Learn more: https://gu.gg/2xPE44R … Photo: David Heald

Gun of the Day - NRA Museums 2018-06-07 13:01

GUN OF THE DAY - A Ranger 1911A1? The Robert E. Petersen Gallery holds many unusual handguns and this Colt 1911A1 is right in there swinging. While some might be captivated by the fine set of stag grips on this GOTD, the oddly truncated trigger guard sets this pistol apart. There are a number of similar handguns in existence that were modified by Texas Ranger Captain Manuel T. Gonzaullas, who spent considerable time in later life in Hollywood, not far from where Robert E. Petersen lived. Is this one of that Ranger's handguns? We just don't know. Caliber: .45 ACP Production Date: 1943 #NRAmuseums #GunOfTheDay #guns #history

National Gallery Photo 2018-06-07 12:43

Gauguin was born #OnThisDay in 1848. 'Bowl of Fruit and Tankard before a Window' by Gauguin is a tribute to a Cézanne painting Gauguin had acquired around 10 years earlier, 'Still Life with Compotier, Glass and Apples'. It repeats many of the elements of this painting, such as the fruit, pottery, rumpled tablecloth and the knife at the lower right. On a wider level it is also indicative of Gauguin moving away from Impressionism to a more structurally rigorous art exemplified by Cézanne's work. View this homage to still life in Room 43: http://bit.ly/2GQArzJ