American Museum of Natural History

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American Museum of N - Look a little closer at the top photo, and | The Sutter’s Mill meteorite is considered | #TBT to Chris Olsen and Bruce Brunner..

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Look a little closer at the top photo, and you’ll see it: the common potoo (Nyctibius griseus) is a master of disguise that roosts on high perches, motionless. Even its large bright eyes, which might catch a predator’s attention, don’t disrupt its camouflage: its eyelids have slits,...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-23 21:33

The Sutter’s Mill meteorite is considered to be one of the rarest types to ever hit the Earth—a carbonaceous chondrite (or stony meteorite) consisting of cosmic dust and presolar materials that helped form the planets of the solar system. Formed about 4.5 billion years ago, the meteorite was t...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-23 02:01

#TBT to Chris Olsen and Bruce Brunner in 1934 working on the Andros Reef diorama, which can still be seen today in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. Coral reefs are created by massive colonies of coral polyps, which are small, soft-bodied animals with hard skeletons that form much of the reef...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-22 21:58

It’s National Margarita Day—and if you’re sipping on pulque, mezcal, or tequila, you can thank bats like the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) and the Mexican long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis). These nectar-feeding mammals are considered “keystone” species within thei...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-22 16:05

This picture-perfect toadstool, with its bright red cap speckled with white, is the fly agaric (Amanita muscaria)—and gets its common name because it was once thought to be used as fly poison. These fungi are also considered toxic to humans and have hallucinogenic properties. On the forest f...

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-22 02:01

Orchid bees sip nectar from flowers with their extraordinarily long tongues. In between drinks, male bees collect fragrant compounds and store them in pockets in their enlarged hind legs. When the mixture is ready, they begin their mating display, hovering or flying in a specific pattern near ...

American Museum of Natural History is with Teresinha Vasconcellos and 3 others.

Watch out, flies! This unassuming plant is the carnivorous Cape sundew (Drosera capensis). Sticky “arms” that line its leaves are covered in clear glue-like mucilage that helps the plant entrap insects and digest them. Their leaves curl in to wrap up the prey. The Cape sundew’s flowers are p...

Nom! Single-Celled Organisms Eat Other Cells

Nom! Single-Celled Organisms Eat Other Cells: Nom nom nom. Who’s hungry? Museum researchers have developed a computer model that can predict which single-celled organisms might “eat” other cells. Learn more! >> https://goo.gl/74UxES
Video: Pondlife Pondlife

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-20 20:15

It’s time for Trilobite Tuesday! Some trilobites had outer shells that featured heads and tails covered in spines, bumps, and pustules. Others, such as this 3-inch-long Dysplanus from the Middle Ordovician of Russia, had shells that were incredibly smooth. Scientists think that such differ...
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American Museum of Natural History Photo 2018-02-23 21:33

The Sutter’s Mill meteorite is considered to be one of the rarest types to ever hit the Earth—a carbonaceous chondrite (or stony meteorite) consisting of cosmic dust and presolar materials that helped form the planets of the solar system. Formed about 4.5 billion years ago, the meteorite was the size of a minivan before it exploded as a fireball over California’s Sierra foothills in April 2012, and less than 950 grams have been found. Its main mass was split among five institutions and resides in collections at our Museum, Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, The Field Museum, Arizona State University, and UC Davis. Photo: Peter Jenniskens and Eric James

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art Photo 2018-02-23 19:25

In February 1924, Tarsila do Amaral traveled to Rio de Janeiro to experience the infamous ‘carnaval carioca,’ the largest carnival in the country. As part of the festivities, the people of Madureira (a neighborhood on the outskirts of Rio) had built a reproduction of the Eiffel Tower. This is a signature example of Tarsila’s work in the 1920s—blending modern and folk art influences to create an abstract, carefully composed version of the local landscape and spirit. #TarsilaMoMA ... [Image: Tarsila do Amaral. “Carnival in Madureira (Carnaval em Madureira).” 1924. Oil on canvas. Acervo da Fundação José e Paulina Nemirovsky, em comodato com a Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo. © Tarsila do Amaral Licenciamentos.]

National Gallery of Art Photo 2018-02-23 16:51

John Singer Sargent's "Ellen Peabody Endicott" exemplifies the artist's approach to society portraiture. Mrs. Endicott is shown seated in an upholstered chair. Beside her is a small wooden table topped with a book and other personal effects. A heavy black mourning dress hints at a possible reason for the sitter’s melancholy expression: the recent death of her husband. What more do you notice? John Singer Sargent, "Ellen Peabody Endicott (Mrs. William Crowninshield Endicott)," 1901, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Louise Thoron Endicott in memory of Mr. and Mrs. William Crowninshield Endicott