Museum of Transport, Greater Manchester

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Museum of Transport, Greater Manchester Photo 2017-10-19 12:32

1960s Weekend at the Museum of Transport, Greater Manchester - this Saturday and Sunday (21/22 October)

CentreShuttle: http://www.gmts.co.uk/assets/cs-m-l-0317.pdf

Further information: http://www.gmts.co.uk/what-s-on.html#mainevent
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#ArtSpeaks: Rajendra Roy on Klaus Nomi - MoMA The Museum of Modern Art 2017-12-12 23:00

#ArtSpeaks: Rajendra Roy on Klaus Nomi: For Rajendra Roy, chief curator in our Department of Film, Klaus Nomi’s cape—now on view in the #Club57nyc exhibition—represents not only the contributions legendary queer artists have made to the world, but also something more personal. At #ArtSpeaks, Raj embraces the eyeliner, and reveals his own bohemian beginnings in New York City, a decade after Club 57 closed its doors. ... #ArtSpeaks, a day of community and conversation in the galleries, returns Tuesday, January 30.

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art Photo 2017-12-12 19:05

For our current #MoMAArtistsChoice exhibition, artist David Hammons brings together two masters. A drawing by Leonardo da Vinci—the first time a work by the artist has been on view at MoMA—is presented with one other work, Charles White’s “Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man).” Astrological readings on the gallery wall suggest a cosmic connection between the two artists. Confronted with the pairing, poet Steve Cannon responded with an original poem. What inspiration do you draw from the pairing of Charles White and Leonardo da Vinci? ... Image Credits: Leonardo da Vinci. “The drapery of a kneeling figure.” c. 1491–94. Brush and black ink with white heightening on pale blue prepared paper. The Royal Collection/HM Queen Elizabeth II. Photo: Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 Charles White. “Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)”. 1973. Oil wash on board. Richard S. Zeisler Bequest (by exchange), The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Committee on Drawings Fund, Dian Woodner, and Agnes Gund. © 2017 The Charles White Archives

British Museum Photo 2017-12-12 17:23

Happy #Hanukkah! The Jewish festival of lights starts tonight, and lasts until 20 December. This is a Hanukkah lamp with eight lights, probably made in the Netherlands in the 18th century. Using a movable candle called the ‘shammash’, one light is lit on the first night, and another light added each night until all eight are lit on the final evening of the festival. The word Hanukkah means 'dedication' in Hebrew, as it commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt (167–160 BC).

National Gallery Photo 2017-12-12 14:40

In 'The Adoration of the Shepherds', Poussin uses a long-established motif, and places the Nativity in a stable built into the ruins of a classical building. This motif appears in the National Gallery's earliest Botticelli, 'Adoration of the Kings', and Poussin's contemporaries the Le Nain brothers used it in their 'Adoration of the Shepherds' of about 1640: http://bit.ly/2A5h6Xa Throughout December, join us on Tuesdays at 4pm in Room 29 for a 10–minute talk on this painting: http://bit.ly/2mXGjhe

American Museum of Natural History Photo 2017-12-12 01:57

Happy birthday to astronomer Annie Jump Cannon! Born on this day in 1863, she attended Wellesley College in 1880, studying physics and astronomy, and later worked with Edward C. Pickering at the Harvard College Observatory as a “computer.” Cannon was known for her skills in star classification—in fact, her simplified system for classifying stars according to their temperature was adopted as the universal standard in the early 1900s and is still used today. She was able to classify about three stars a minute and classified more than 225,000 stars over her lifetime. Cannon was also the first woman to receive an honorary doctorate from Oxford University, as well as the first women to be elected as an officer of the American Astronomical Society. Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images