The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum

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The Ships at South S - February 13, the day the United Nations Radio | Thanks to all of our volunteers who came | Happy Friday! Here a few new updates..

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The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum Photo 2018-02-13 21:26

February 13, the day the United Nations Radio was established in 1946, is #WorldRadioDay. The objectives of the Day were to raise greater awareness among the public and the media of the importance of radio; to encourage decision makers to establish and provide access to information through r...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Thanks to all of our volunteers who came out this past Saturday! Our Executive Director, Captain Jonathan Boulware, joined us to discuss the exciting programmatic collaboration between our beloved Lettie G Howard, and U.S. Brig Niagara and the Erie Maritime Museum. We are thrilled with this ...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Happy Friday! Here a few new updates on our tugboat W.O. Decker. Work is progressing steadily on the hull and the deckhouse: the stem (large timber at the bow) was removed to allow proper measurements of the existing member to be taken so that a new stem can be made, and more strakes of be...

The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum Photo 2018-02-01 17:30

The South Street Seaport Museum is pleased to announce an exciting new program opportunity for our beloved schooner Lettie G Howard - later in 2018 she will voyage to Lake Erie, embarking on an 2018-2019 programmatic collaboration with U.S. Brig Niagara and the Erie Maritime Museum.

In May,...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

W.O. Decker project crew has been hard at work shaping and installing new members, as can be seen in the photos.

More sections of beam shelf have been installed, allowing for installation of new deck beams, as the deck beams sit on the beam shelf. The crew has begun replacing some of the...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Work on W.O. Decker’s hull and deckhouse are continuing, and the changes are noticeable! More sections of sheer clamp have been installed since our last update, and the work on the deckhouse is a mix of disassembly and repairs. You can help with the restoration by clicking the link below to ma...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Thanks to the cover over the vessel, the project crew and vessel itself were largely unaffected by last week’s snow and wind. Our hardy project crew made and installed new members, while continuing to remove members that will soon be replaced.

While it may seem odd that new members are bei...

Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Workshops, workshops, workshops! Our amazing waterfront crew and volunteers rang in the first Volunteer’s Saturday of 2018 with a couple of hands-on training activities! Volunteers had a chance to learn about tool restoration and care techniques, the basics of welding, and forging.

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Photos from The Ships at South Street Seaport Museum's post

Happy Monday! Check out these updates on the restoration project of our beloved tugboat W.O. Decker. The project crew has been hard at work removing upper hull planking and deck beams to assess the condition of underlying structure and to take measurements of any members that need to be replaced o...
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British Museum Photo 2018-02-22 19:00

‘I love the sculptures of ancient Greece. They have been and remain my masters’ Rodin had a collection of over 6,000 antiquities, and even opened a museum to house them. He enjoyed showing people the subtle modelling of the carved marble in night-time lamplit tours. Many of these classical sculptures were weathered, broken or incomplete, which inspired Rodin to remove the heads, arms and legs of his own works. He was trying to emulate the archaeological fragments he collected, and those he saw in the British Museum – the artist was a frequent visitor after he first viewed the galleries in 1881. Our #RodinExhibition will bring together Rodin’s beautiful sculptures with the ancient works that helped inspire them – opening 26 April, book tickets here: http://ow.ly/CEN530iyCuE

National Gallery of Art Photo 2018-02-22 16:51

Jean Siméon Chardin worked from arrangements directly in front of him. He rarely made detailed drawings that were standard academic practice. Instead, the artist would slowly build thick layers of paint to create depths of color and complexity. In "Fruit, Jug, and a Glass" Chardin used a mixture of different hues and a variety of brushstrokes to match the texture of each surface. Jean Siméon Chardin, "Fruit, Jug, and a Glass," c. 1726/1728, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Chester Dale Collection